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Indranil Roy quits Hewitt Associates joins Korn/Ferry

Indranil Roy (XLRI pmir ’98 batch) after a long innings at Hewitt Associates (11 years) where he was the Global head of the Leadership Consulting business joined Korn/Ferry as MD, Asia Pacific of Leadership and Talent Mangement Group.

Indro, as he was known in XL also has a thought provoking blog on Leadership issues.

From the news websites:

 

Based in Singapore, Mr. Roy is responsible for further driving the growth of the L&TC business throughout the region and building a team of leadership consultants with a diverse range of capabilities. He will also lead Korn/Ferry’s efforts in generating a unique platform of thought leadership for Asian talent.
Mr. Roy joins Korn/Ferry from Hewitt Associates, where he was the global head of the Leadership Consulting business. Renowned as an executive coach in the areas of cross-cultural leadership, Mr. Roy brings with him extensive experience in consulting across a wide range of sectors including financial services, IT, government, consumer and healthcare. His work with global clients has focused on leadership alignment and effectiveness, with a specific focus on board effectiveness, top team alignment and senior executive coaching.
Mr. Roy succeeds David Everhart, currently based in Shanghai, who will be returning to the United States to continue working within the practice.
“I am delighted that Indranil has decided to join Korn/Ferry and am convinced that he will be able to develop the L&TC business in Asia Pacific to its full potential,” said Charles Tseng, President, Asia Pacific for Korn/Ferry. “Indranil will continue to build on the momentum that David has started in growing the practice in Asia over the last three years from two consultants to a team of 15 strong.”
Korn/Ferry Leadership and Talent Consulting helps companies implement their business strategy and achieve high performance by improving the effectiveness of their organizations, executive leadership and talent management programs. Korn/Ferry’s solutions are delivered by a global team of consultants, supported by research-based and market-leading intellectual property, methodologies and tools.

Based in Singapore, Mr. Roy is responsible for further driving the growth of the L&TC business throughout the region and building a team of leadership consultants with a diverse range of capabilities. He will also lead Korn/Ferry’s efforts in generating a unique platform of thought leadership for Asian talent.

Mr. Roy joins Korn/Ferry from Hewitt Associates, where he was the global head of the Leadership Consulting business. Renowned as an executive coach in the areas of cross-cultural leadership, Mr. Roy brings with him extensive experience in consulting across a wide range of sectors including financial services, IT, government, consumer and healthcare. His work with global clients has focused on leadership alignment and effectiveness, with a specific focus on board effectiveness, top team alignment and senior executive coaching.

Mr. Roy succeeds David Everhart, currently based in Shanghai, who will be returning to the United States to continue working within the practice.

“I am delighted that Indranil has decided to join Korn/Ferry and am convinced that he will be able to develop the L&TC business in Asia Pacific to its full potential,” said Charles Tseng, President, Asia Pacific for Korn/Ferry. “Indranil will continue to build on the momentum that David has started in growing the practice in Asia over the last three years from two consultants to a team of 15 strong.”

Korn/Ferry Leadership and Talent Consulting helps companies implement their business strategy and achieve high performance by improving the effectiveness of their organizations, executive leadership and talent management programs. Korn/Ferry’s solutions are delivered by a global team of consultants, supported by research-based and market-leading intellectual property, methodologies and tools.

On Leadership “Gurus”

The Bnet blog has a critical look:

In Thought Leaders & Gurus: Too Big for Their NichesAllen Weiss suggests the following:

My sense is that all of this thought-leader stuff is really just for selling something. The same goes for the word “guru.” That’s fine, I guess, if you want to characterize yourself in some new age words in order to sell books.

 

I couldn’t agree more. I also think the last thing we need when we’re all struggling with a global financial crisis is some self-proclaimed thought leader telling us where we went wrong and how, if we follow and pay for their brand of thinking, we’ll be better managers.

I personally think gurus/thought leaders/pundits/analysts or whatever you call them are necessary to generate ideas and spread them, but do approach them with a skeptic’s viewpoint, and not of the newly converted. 

Remember, there are no new ideas. Only old ideas in new contexts.